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i do not know any doctors or dentists personally. what do you think are the pros and cons of each degree. like job prospects, how academically demanding they are, postgraduation in them, lifestyles, and dont groan... pay!!!
 

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Basically from what i've heard, is dentists get much more pay than doctors in UK especially if you have a good practice. If you specialise and go into Orthodontist then even more money can be made.

But also in medicine in UK the pay is increasing, especially if you are a GP.

The first 2 years of the course are similar, since you learn roughly the same stuff, but then in the clinical years you get more practice dealing with patients in dentistry.

At the end of the day it's up to the person himself, whatever field they are interested in they should go for.

Me personally, I would prefer medicine due to the depth of the course, and the variety, you can choose to specialise in anything that suits you, e.g. become a GP, become a surgeon, become a pathologist...etc
 

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Hours of work:

Dentists win hands down. Its pretty much a 9-5 job (depending on where your practice is). There a very few on-call weekends (in your career) and you dont have to work very late hours either.
As a doc. be prepared to get it in the neck a bit. My sister recently had to work a 60 hours over a 3-day weekend as a junior house officer (which is slightly illegal) but that kind of thing is often overlooked. Although hours get better when you hit your speciality its a rocky road getting there.

Pay:

In the UK dentists were definately payed more than doc's however recent pay changes kicked in this year after government legislation was changed in May. (The following was taken from Prospects.ac.uk-
Typical starting salary: £27,500 for vocational dental practitioners (VDPs) (salary data collected March 06).
Range of typical salaries at senior level/with experience (eg, after 10-15 years in role): £50,000 - £70,000 (salary data collected March 06).
In trust hospitals of The National Health Service (NHS), dentists are paid according to nationally defined scales, ranging from £19,703 for a house officer (newly qualified) to £67,133 - £90,838 at consultant level (salary data collected March 06).
Private dental consultants can earn above 200,000.
Whereas with docs:
Junior doctors in their first year of the postgraduate foundation training earn £20, 741. In their second year, they earn £25,882.
Doctors in specialty training earn between £29,000 and £44,000.
The average salary of hospital doctors five years after graduation from medical school is £48,000 and can then rise by increments to around £77,000.
The basic pay for full-time consultants is £70,000 - £94,000 (all salary figures collected Dec 06 from NHS Careers).
Salaries can be subsidised with private work.

Finding a job:

Finding a job that YOU WANT as a doctor it getting more tough now (with recent government changes). Theres a national shortage of dentists so there's an abundance of VT (Vocational training) jobs in dentistry so finding a job where you want isn't that tough.

Qualifying from abroad:

If you qualify from a non-EU accredited uni then you have to sit professional conversion exams in both professions. (See the dentistry thread for specific dental exams).

Academics:

Okay so, from what I have been told... both are really difficult degrees regardless of which country you get your degree from. Both medics and dento's study pretty much the same stuff for the first couple of years and split when it comes to clinicals etc... obviously as dentists you have to go into oral anatomy/neuro a bit more than the meds, however as a medics you need to know lots and lots about everything else. But one is not easier than the other!
 

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Hours of work:


Academics:

Okay so, from what I have been told... both are really difficult degrees regardless of which country you get your degree from. Both medics and dento's study pretty much the same stuff for the first couple of years and split when it comes to clinicals etc... obviously as dentists you have to go into oral anatomy/neuro a bit more than the meds, however as a medics you need to know lots and lots about everything else. But one is not easier than the other!

Errr not entirely accurate.

As a medic Im not being bias...just some facts. Not to underestimate dentistry but without a shadow of a doubt medicine is a more academically challenging degree. Whether it be in the clinical or pre-clinical stages. I dont refute for a second dentistry is an excellent degree which pays better and is materialistically more rewarding. I have many friends in the dental field after discussing with them who all agreed medicine is more challenging-The major difference is that medicine just covers suc a broad spectrum-in terms of how much depth you cover the detail depends upon your course structure. As for dentists doing more neurology-thats not again entirely true. You'd be suprised the amount of neuro we cover. To put things into perspective we once had some final year dentists on our Gastro clinics-apparantely it was part of their rotation as some intestine diseases can manifest with signs in the mouth. Anyways it was quite shocking that they didnt know their basic anatomy of the intestine-im not putting them down. Indeed medics will probs know not much about the dental aspects but we cover anatomy and common conditions. However the creme of all is Maxillofacial surgeons-after speaking to some friends in this field they also agreed that medicine was more challenging.

At the end of the day career choice is personal preference. Dentistry is a fantastic degree, which is academically and financially rewarding but as my dentist friends say can be extremely boring once qualified. On the other hand persoanlly I would say medicine is academically rewarding but in terms of financial reward its definitely not the pound people think it to be. Nontheless, i've never heard a doctor say they find their job boring.
 

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both are good mbbs is long and more time demanding and bds is less time consuming and money making is more there
 

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Ok well let state some more facts.

Highest suicide rate: dentists
(Highest alcoholism rate: doctors)
XD

If you easy get lonely do not become a dentist because that is the main reason why the suicide rate is high. Do not only look at the money.
 

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Hi!

I have read this question in many forums and I don't think that the answer to this question is that easy.
1. You have identify you interests
2. if u think u want to deal with patients in your profession and you like the subjects of medicine than the only choice is between BDS and MBBS.
3. BDS is only for people who love to perform handicraft work and you should also like the very precise work ( I am talking about 0,5 mm ) and mini surgery + they should also like what I mentioned in point 2
4. other wise I would choose MBBS where you have got many choices

Please never think about money factor and about short cuts .... If you are good in any field you will be very successful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

( I hope it helps people who have the same question )
 

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Errr not entirely accurate.

As a medic Im not being bias...just some facts. Not to underestimate dentistry but without a shadow of a doubt medicine is a more academically challenging degree. Whether it be in the clinical or pre-clinical stages. I dont refute for a second dentistry is an excellent degree which pays better and is materialistically more rewarding. I have many friends in the dental field after discussing with them who all agreed medicine is more challenging-The major difference is that medicine just covers suc a broad spectrum-in terms of how much depth you cover the detail depends upon your course structure.As for dentists doing more neurology-thats not again entirely true. You'd be suprised the amount of neuro we cover. To put things into perspective we once had some final year dentists on our Gastro clinics-apparantely it was part of their rotation as some intestine diseases can manifest with signs in the mouth. Anyways it was quite shocking that they didnt know their basic anatomy of the intestine-im not putting them down. Indeed medics will probs know not much about the dental aspects but we cover anatomy and common conditions. However the creme of all is Maxillofacial surgeons-after speaking to some friends in this field they also agreed that medicine was more challenging.

At the end of the day career choice is personal preference. Dentistry is a fantastic degree, which is academically and financially rewarding but as my dentist friends say can be extremely boring once qualified. On the other hand persoanlly I would say medicine is academically rewarding but in terms of financial reward its definitely not the pound people think it to be. Nontheless, i've never heard a doctor say they find their job boring.
I don't like to say that either dental or medical school is easy. They are both different and challenging. I'm currently a dental student at UPenn. In response to the med student that said a dentist doesn't remember the anatomy of the intestine, I would say that a med student, in 4 years, doesn't have the surgical skills that a dentist is taught in order to perform complicated procedures in the mouth.

A dental student has a broader skill set than a medical student at the end of 4 years because they know the sciences, but they also know how to perform a bunch of procedures in the mouth that a med student would certainly butcher. So, if a dental student doesn't remember something about the intestine, I think they have a pretty good excuse that the med student certainly doesn't have.

I have personally meant many doctors who regret not becoming a dentist, so to say more dentists grow bored with their profession is completely biased. It is also quite obvious that you have know idea the amount of artistry or complexity that is involved in the profession when you use the term "boring".

Or, you have meant some very average dentists that just stive to get by. It is lifelong learning, and extremely challenging just like your field.
 

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I don't like to say that either dental or medical school is easy. They are both different and challenging. I'm currently a dental student at UPenn. In response to the med student that said a dentist doesn't remember the anatomy of the intestine, I would say that a med student, in 4 years, doesn't have the surgical skills that a dentist is taught in order to perform complicated procedures in the mouth.

A dental student has a broader skill set than a medical student at the end of 4 years because they know the sciences, but they also know how to perform a bunch of procedures in the mouth that a med student would certainly butcher. So, if a dental student doesn't remember something about the intestine, I think they have a pretty good excuse that the med student certainly doesn't have.

I have personally meant many doctors who regret not becoming a dentist, so to say more dentists grow bored with their profession is completely biased. It is also quite obvious that you have know idea the amount of artistry or complexity that is involved in the profession when you use the term "boring".

Or, you have meant some very average dentists that just stive to get by. It is lifelong learning, and extremely challenging just like your field.
It is clear from your response that you failed to read my post accurately let alone make judgement appropriately. My example of the anatomy of the intestine was to highlight that medicine covers a broad spectrum. And honestly to state that a dentist can be fogiven for not remembering basic anatomy of the intestine (which is not an overtly complex organ) is debatable-if it was an in depth question then that in itself is a different matter. Your comments about surgery in dentistry and medics being unable to prefom this are flawed? Did anyone ever state that anyone expects medics to be trained in maxfac surgery or that they are superior? Indeed, if asked most medics will know at least the basic head and neck anatomy. So to state that dentists are not expected to know basic intestinal anatomy - given that it overlaps with mouth disease presentation is unjustifiable.

To state that dental students have a 'broader' range of skills is not true-Im sure even a lay person would know this. As for my dental friends-I have some pride in informing you that they are amongst the best in the region in senior positions- something I might point out that as a student you still have a far way to achieve before passing judgement.

The original post was not meant to be a pallet for arguement. I dont want any bitter tastes left . I merely aimed to put things into perspective as honestly as I could and did not by any means beat on about how superior medicine was to dentistry-something I made clear in my original post. My last comment on this thread: I will leave it to the readers to make their own judgement...
 
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